What are the main cells of the spinal cord?

What type of cells are in the spinal cord?

These cells are located at all levels of the spinal cord and are grouped into three main categories: root cells, column or tract cells and propriospinal cells. The root cells are situated in the ventral and lateral gray horns and vary greatly in size.

What are spinal cells called?

Like the brain, the spinal cord consists of gray and white matter. The butterfly-shaped center of the cord consists of gray matter. The front wings (usually called anterior or ventral horns) contain motor nerve cells (neurons), which transmit information from the brain or spinal cord to muscles, stimulating movement.

What is the structure and function of the spinal cord?

The spinal cord is part of the central nervous system. This long structure runs down the center of your back, and it mediates messages between the brain and the peripheral nerves. The spinal cord is primarily composed of nerves, which are organized in systematic pathways, also described as tracts.

What are the two main functions of the spinal cord?

The spinal cord functions primarily in the transmission of nerve signals from the motor cortex to the body, and from the afferent fibers of the sensory neurons to the sensory cortex. It is also a center for coordinating many reflexes and contains reflex arcs that can independently control reflexes.

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What happens if your spinal cord hurts?

Emergency signs and symptoms of a spinal cord injury after an accident include: Extreme back pain or pressure in your neck, head or back. Weakness, incoordination or paralysis in any part of your body. Numbness, tingling or loss of sensation in your hands, fingers, feet or toes.

What are two types of nervous system cells?

There are two broad classes of cells in the nervous system: neurons, which process information, and glia, which provide the neurons with mechanical and metabolic support. Three general categories of neurons are commonly recognized (Peters, Palay, & Webster, 1976).