What is the basic pathology of rheumatoid arthritis?

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What is the basic pathogenic process in rheumatoid arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic symmetric polyarticular joint disease that primarily affects the small joints of the hands and feet. The inflammatory process is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells into the joints, leading to proliferation of synoviocytes and destruction of cartilage and bone.

What are the pathological changes of rheumatoid arthritis?

RA primarily affects the lining of the synovial joints and can cause progressive disability, premature death, and socioeconomic burdens. The clinical manifestations of symmetrical joint involvement include arthralgia, swelling, redness, and even limiting the range of motion.

What is pathophysiology of arthritis?

Although the pathophysiology of RA is not completely understood, the process generally involves dysregulated inflammation, with antigen presentation, T-cell activation, and autoantibody production all serving as mediators in the inflammatory process.

What is the most common cause of rheumatoid arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition, which means it’s caused by the immune system attacking healthy body tissue. However, it’s not yet known what triggers this. Your immune system normally makes antibodies that attack bacteria and viruses, helping to fight infection.

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How do you classify rheumatoid arthritis?

A patient was classified as having RA if at least four of these seven criteria were satisfied; four of the criteria must have been present for at least six weeks: morning stiffness, arthritis of three or more joint areas, arthritis of the hands, and symmetric arthritis.

What is the Immunopathogenesis of RA?

Thus, RA is characterized by evidence of disordered innate immunity, including immune complex-mediated complement activation, adaptive immune responses against ‘self’-antigens comprising predominantly post-translationally modified proteins, dysregulated cytokine networks, osteoclast and chondrocyte activation and …

How can rheumatoid arthritis be prevented?

Preventing Rheumatoid Arthritis

  1. Stop Smoking.
  2. Limit Alcohol.
  3. Minimize Bone Loss.
  4. Improve Oral Health.
  5. Increase Fish Intake.
  6. Maintain a Healthy Weight.
  7. Stay Active.
  8. Reduce Exposure to Environmental Pollutants.

What is the etiological agent for rheumatoid arthritis?

Human parvovirus B19 as a causative agent for rheumatoid arthritis.

How do you permanently treat rheumatoid arthritis?

There is no cure for rheumatoid arthritis. But clinical studies indicate that remission of symptoms is more likely when treatment begins early with medications known as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs).

What is pathophysiology of a disease?

: the physiology of abnormal states specifically : the functional changes that accompany a particular syndrome or disease.

What cells are involved in rheumatoid arthritis?

The interaction among these cellular components in joint synovium is quite complicated, including T cells and DC cells (2), T cells and NK cells (3), macrophages and fibroblasts (4), etc. Among them, T cells (5) and macrophages (6) are recognized as two critical cellular components involved in RA.

What cells causes inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis?

T cells and B cells are two types of white blood cells involved in rheumatoid arthritis. The T cells release cytokines (chemicals that play a role in the inflammatory response) and cause the B cells to release antibodies (immune proteins), which causes inflammation.

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