How long are you in hospital after a hip replacement?

What is the average hospital stay after hip replacement surgery?

Typically, you will stay in the hospital one to three days after surgery, depending on how quickly you progress with physical therapy. Once you’re able to walk longer distances and are making consistent progress, you’ll be ready to go home.

How long does it take to recover from a hip replacement?

“On average, hip replacement recovery can take around two to four weeks, but everyone is different,” says Thakkar. It depends on a few factors, including how active you were before your surgery, your age, nutrition, preexisting conditions, and other health and lifestyle factors.

How painful is a hip replacement?

You can expect to experience some discomfort in the hip region itself, as well as groin pain and thigh pain. This is normal as your body adjusts to changes made to joints in that area. There can also be pain in the thigh and knee that is typically associated with a change in the length of your leg.

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Is hip replacement considered major surgery?

Total hip replacement surgery is a major surgery and there are some potential risks that should be discussed with your doctor. Although the success rate for this procedure is high, common risks include: Blood clots in the leg and pelvis. Infection in the hip.

What can you never do after hip replacement?

The Don’ts

  • Don’t cross your legs at the knees for at least 6 to 8 weeks.
  • Don’t bring your knee up higher than your hip.
  • Don’t lean forward while sitting or as you sit down.
  • Don’t try to pick up something on the floor while you are sitting.
  • Don’t turn your feet excessively inward or outward when you bend down.

How far should I walk each day after hip replacement?

In the beginning, walk for 5 or 10 minutes, 3 or 4 times a day. As your strength and endurance improve, you can walk for 20 to 30 minutes, 2 or 3 times a day. Once you have fully recovered, regular walks of 20 to 30 minutes, 3 or 4 times a week, will help maintain your strength.

Can I go back to work 2 weeks after hip replacement?

When can I go back to work? Patients may be off work two weeks to three months after joint replacement surgery. People who work desk jobs tend to return in a few weeks. Returning to a job that involves standing or manual labor usually takes longer.

Is it OK to sit in a recliner after hip replacement surgery?

Try to sit in a straight back chair (avoid low sofas, recliners, or zero-gravity chairs) for the first 6 weeks. Do NOT sleep in a recliner. Your hip will get stiff in a flexed position and be harder to straighten out. Do not extend your hip or leg backwards for 6 weeks.

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Can you wait too long for a hip replacement?

If you wait too long, the surgery will be less effective. As your joint continues to deteriorate and your mobility becomes less and less, your health will worsen as well (think weight gain, poor cardiovascular health, etc.) Patients who go into surgery healthier tend to have better outcomes.

Can you live a normal life after hip replacement?

And researchers, led by Washington University specialists at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, have a found that the vast majority of patients return to work, to a normal sex life and to other activities after hip replacement surgery.

Is getting a hip replacement worth it?

Your doctor might recommend hip replacement if: You have very bad pain, and other treatments have not helped. You have lost a large amount of cartilage. Your hip pain is keeping you from being active enough to keep up your strength, flexibility, balance, or endurance.

What should I do 2 weeks after hip replacement?

One or two weeks after surgery you’ll probably be able to:

  • Move about your home more easily.
  • Walk short distances, to your mailbox, around the block, or perhaps even further.
  • Prepare your own meals. One to 2 weeks after surgery you may be able to stand at the kitchen counter without a walking aid. …
  • Take showers.